Goats and Compression Socks

Meet Cuyler:

Hiking Guru, Pack Goat Trainer, High Adventure Girl Scout Leader, Team Builder, and Trailblazer.

img_3788

She is the one who taught me to love hiking. Through her knowledge, experience, patience, and encouragement, I learned hiking wasn’t about rushing from point A to B as fast as you can. Hiking was meant to be enjoyed step-by-step; allowing the beauty of the surroundings to completely envelop your entire being. She introduced me to quality light-weight equipment, trekking poles, and the essentials of a good fitting backpack.

She also invited me to be part of a hiking trip to Switzerland! Yes, I will forever be in her debt!

 


She and her husband raise and train pack goats to carry extra supplies as needed on backpacking trips. Each goat can comfortably carry about 35 pounds. Not only are they useful, but they’re very entertaining as well. Eating whatever is in reach of their mouths on the trail, there is never any need to bring their own food. They seriously eat anything. Including packs. So one must be watchful. And they love to cuddle up right next to you anytime you sit down. Being cuddled by a stinky, horned creature is not exactly my idea of comfort; but it is nice to be loved. And even nicer to have extra supplies literally off your back onto theirs!

To learn more about Cuyler, her pack goats, and her unique Girl Scout troop, visit: NAZ Today (youtube)



Now, what do compression socks and goats have to do with each other? Nothing really, I just had both on my mind. I’m sure by the time I finish this article I’ll find a way to connect the two, though.

If one must wear compression socks, why not look stylish? Or even sporty, like a soccer player?! No reason at all. So, I decided to give these a try to see if they prevent that odd rash I occasionally get around my ankles. I put them on and gave them a trial run around the house.

img_3811

 

They felt great, almost massage like. I took them off several hours later and as you can see, they left a lovely pattern engraved into my skin.

img_3812

I’m not sure if this is normal or not. Deep etchings and clear enough to read the brand name? Is this an advertising strategy? If so, it went terribly wrong. Before you start a fund for my reconstructive surgery, I can cheerfully announce all signs of branding disappeared by morning. Phew!

Now for the question to connect the two themed article:

Should I wear these ever again? Or should they become a snack for the goats?